Taylen Henry, a Transylvania University student from Marshall County, will graduate later this month. She will attend medical school through the University of Louisville’s Trover program, which focuses on rural medicine training.

After working on COVID and tornadoes, this Transy graduate hopes to become an emergency physician


Taylen Henry, a student at Transylvanian University in Marshall County, is graduating later this month.  He will be attending medical school through the University of Louisville Trover program, which focuses on training in rural medicine.

Taylen Henry, a student at Transylvanian University in Marshall County, is graduating later this month. He will be attending medical school through the University of Louisville Trover program, which focuses on training in rural medicine.

Provided by Transylvania University

Although Taylen Henry, a University of Transylvania student, has not yet attended medical school, she has already experienced two major emergencies from the hospital’s perspective.

Henry, who graduated in Transylvania this weekend, worked at Marshall County Hospital throughout the pandemic at the emergency room and then again after a tornado hit the state. She hopes to become an emergency room doctor at a rural hospital like the one in which she has worked for several years.

“It was the hardest thing I’ve ever worked on,” Henry said when he mentioned working in a hospital after a tornado. “Except for the pandemic.”

Henry had just returned home for a winter break in December. She arrived home and almost immediately had to hide in the basement of her mother’s house in Benton, Kentucky, as storms and tornadoes hit the area. Fortunately, her family did not suffer any major damage from the storm or injuries.

But Benton is about 30 minutes from Mayfield, which was hit hard during the tornadoes, and Marshall County Hospital quickly became busy, Henry said.

Henry’s mom, a nurse, was called to the hospital around 2:00. Henry had to work in the emergency room the next morning and came to help soon. People were being transported to Benton from Mayfield, Henry said, and “it was chaotic.”

She started going to patients, transporting them to their rooms and cleaning hospital rooms. She worked for about 14 hours that day and did what she could at the hospital. It reminded her why she wanted to do rural medicine because “you really have to see the community come out,” Henry said. Nurses and volunteers called or came to the hospital and asked how they could help.

The experience only strengthened her desire to become an emergency room doctor, she said. Henry said she felt like she had valuable experience working in a smaller environment and could meet doctors she may not have in another hospital.

Henry began working at the hospital part-time when she was 18 and still in high school. She knew she wanted to do something in the medical field, inspired by her mother, but she wasn’t entirely sure what she wanted to do. She worked at the emergency room and said that was what inspired her to pursue a career as an emergency doctor.

“It’s the most immediate form of helping people,” Henry said.

Henry was accepted to the University of Louisville Trover Rural Track to pursue rural medicine. The Madisonville-based program accepts about 10 students each year for their clinical rotation and trains them in rural medicine.

Henry said she knew the Trover program was the next step for her because it reminded her of Transylvania. Her interview for the program was a week after the tornado hit Kentucky, and their first questions were about whether she was okay.

Henry said she valued her experience, from the hospital to Transylvania, and helped her prepare for the next step in medical school.

“This experience has helped me prepare for any situation that might go through the door,” Henry said. “And to be quite honest, you’ll never know about every situation that passes through the door anyway.” You just have to be able to adapt to any situation, stay calm and cool, stay in the lead and solve the problem. ”

Monica Kast covers college education for Herald-Leader and Kentucky.com. She previously did higher education in Tennessee for the Knoxville News Sentinel. Hailing from Louisville, Kentucky, she is a graduate of Western Kentucky University.
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